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Operation Fool’s Gold

Origin

In 1965, Lyndon B. Johnson uses a sophisticated cipher during his “Great Society” State of the Union Address to broadcast an ultimatum to the Seeknoms in order to stop an imminent attack from alien forces. During his speech, his words were translated as the following:

“President:…on the basis of your accomplishments…you decide…we can… meet… real value…from bragging…the turmoil of your capital…that pursuit is the test of our success as Nation.”

Unfortunately, Johnson did not realize that the message was transmitted to HWT disciples, not the representatives of the invading army of the Seeknom. In fact, while the message should have been a warning to prevent an assault, the message was taken by the HWT as an invitation to become allies in a much larger war and had nothing to do with the upcoming invasion.

Johnson began working with the HWT to plan Operation Fool’s Gold, an elaborate plan with intentions to subvert an alien invasion force. However, Johnson’s folly would only go undiscovered for a few years as the plan would reach the highest levels of international fame and attention. Ironically, the harder Johnson tried to keep this operation quiet, the louder and more overt it became.

As testimony to his embarrassment, Johnson destroyed all documents and proof of Operation Fool’s Gold. Also, many of those who participated in the clandestine effort were either killed, exiled, or sent to a HWT shrine and forced to take a vow of silence.

Without official documents, the only information that exists is pure conjecture as the result extensive interviews with various humans and aliens that were either directly connected or rumored connected. The most notable individual to the legend of Operation Fool’s Gold was Major Tom Darling, a British intelligence officer assigned to early NASA spaceflight. He was tasked with communicating with the Seeknom and was unofficially on board every early NASA spaceflight, which was made famous during a live concert in which David Bowie, HWT special agent Ziggy Stardust, communicated a heavily encrypted and deeply moving cease-fire treaty in 1972.

His outstanding skills as an interstellar diplomat were almost the lone reason for the cease fire. Here is a brief transcript of the HWT translated message from the performance:

“Ground control to Major Tom…Commencing…love…you’ve really made the grade…now it’s time…there’s nothing I can do…your circuits dead…planet Earth is blue…”

While there has been much debate as to the meaning of “blue” in this context, the greatest amount of attention has been given to the “your circuits are dead,” reference as it seems to suggest a robotic or computer presence on Earth.

Phase I – Replace the Beatles

The initial objective of Operation Fool’s Gold was to infiltrate the Seeknom communication network, which was deeply embedded in the international music world, known as Rock n Roll. The current representatives for the Seeknom were the Beatles, who had recently gained fame for their music announcing plans for world domination:

  • Meet the Beatles
  • Twist and Shout
  • A Hard Day’s Night
  • Help!

According to HWT historians Knought Roo and Hall Fibs, the first Beatles’ albums were euphemisms for the upcoming death of all humans.

After great debate and numerous sack races to establish a plan of action, Operation Fool’s Gold was written and called for the creation of a band to replace the Beatles. Specifically, this group would be so similar to the Beatles that no one would notice them, especially the alien attackers, the Seeknom. This group would consist of 4 members of the HWT military Special Forces:

  • Peter Tork, HWT Air Force Commando
  • Davy Jones, HWT Navy SEAL
  • Michael Nesmith, HWT Marine Corps Recon
  • Micky Dolenz, HWT Salvation Army Gift Wrapper

Officially known as the Monkees and recorded weekly on television, the Monkees were set to take the viewers from the Beatles and reduce the alien attackers to negotiations. While the Seeknom and HWT followers were completely unable to distinguish between the Monkees and the Beatles, almost no one else saw any resemblance whatsoever. In fact, the operation began plans to move on to Phase II before the first air date of Phase I.

Despite those in charge of the operation’s belief in its immediate failure, the Seeknom were instantaneously convinced that peace may be necessary for their survival and efforts began to disarm and prepare for peace talks. The most powerful argument behind their belief was the Monkee’s playlist, unimaginably poignant to the Seeknom:

  • I’m a believer
  • Daydream Believer
  • The Door into Summer
  • Pleasant Valley Sunday
  • Last Train to Clarksville
  • Goin’ Down

NOTE: The operatives and mission were put together so quickly, no one even know if they could play instruments or if they would need to for this mission.

Each of these songs presented a clear threat to the Seeknom and initiated the peace process years before Operation Fool’s Gold concluded. Also, the Seeknom were particularly horrified by the Monkee documentary’s theme song, which included the following warning:

(Highlights)

“Here we come…We go wherever we want to, do what we like to do…Just look over your shoulder, guess who’ll be standing there… you never know where we’ll be found, so you’d better get ready, we may be comin’ to your town.”

Phase II – Negotiate

As the Monkees began to influence the Seeknom to embrace peace, the Beatles were professing the destruction of Earth. Some refer to this period as the War/Peace Serenade. Operation Fool’s Gold, could not rely on massive deception and opted to directly confront the Seeknom. By 1968, the television documentary The Monkees had been cancelled, and the agents had been assigned their new missions against the Seeknom–establish a dialogue and commence negotiations.

The negotiation conversations continued by using album and song names. Sometimes the bands would use theatrics on album covers to expand the conversation to include emotions and determination.

Notable portions of the conversations include the following:

  • Beatles initial threats to Seeknom (and the Monkees) with Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. Upon inspection of the album cover, HWT agents and the Seeknom were informed of third-party arbitration by the Rolling Stones.
  • The Monkees responded to the Beatles’ threat with astronomical coordinates for a precision attack on Earth in the album Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn, & Jones, Ltd.
  • The Rolling Stones acknowledged the Beatles’ invitation to serve as arbitrator with the release of Between the Buttons.
  • The Rolling Stones then challenged the Monkee’s attack plan with the release of Their Satanic Majesties Request.
  • Meanwhile the Beatles’ suggested innocence and passive strength with the release of the Magical Mystery Tour.
  • David Bowie entered the conversation with his self-titled album, David Bowie,  in an effort to bring Operation Fool’s Gold into the discussion, which had been dominated by the “rock” stars.
  • Bowie then released The Man Who Sold the World to suggest that Earth would be reasonable in a negotiation.
  • The Rolling Stones, who had been side-lined in the conversation by David Bowie’s intrusion, released a singular response aimed at David, Beggar’s Banquet.
  • In response to the Stones, Bowie released Hunky Dory.
  • At this point, the Seeknom had decided that Earth was too much trouble and began communicating signs of peace, as seen by the Beatles’ release of Let It Be.
  • The Rolling Stones released Let It Bleed in an attempt to incite conflict, which never happened.
  • The Monkees then released Changes.

For a brief moment, the most powerful and high profile musicians in the world were having a conversation with aliens, and no one knew. In fact, the desire for the wild and outrageous fueled the public perception of Rock and Roll from the 50’s crooners in suits to the androgynous, outwardly alien-like screamers in the 70’s.

PHASE III – The KISS Army

Since President Johnson was out of the office and working hard to erase Operation Fool’s Gold from history and the negotiations began before the army could be established, this phase of the operation was cancelled. To defend Earth in the event of total war between HWT, the Seeknom, and Earth, KISS was created to engage in both the Rock and Roll conversation as well as to command legions of troops. They were known as:

  • Paul Stanley: The Starchild
  • Gene Simmons: The Demon
  • Ace Frehley: The Spaceman (The Space Ace)
  • Peter Criss: Catman

While equally intimidating as rockers and warriors, KISS and the KISS army were never used in battle. The records of Operation Fool’s Gold were destroyed, but the legacy continued through the many bands, like KISS, that remained in place to defend Earth. Also, despite the operation’s failure, many U.S. and world leaders recognized Johnson’s efforts and contributing to its safety. To further that safety and publicly honor Johnson, NASA opened the Johnson Space Center as the center-piece for its space program, which would continue to work with the HWT and the Seeknom.

NOTE: Years later, the Rolling Stones would release “It’s Only Rock and Roll” in an effort to quiet rumors that rock bands, musicians, and rock music were involved with government cover-ups and alien communications. Of course, most humans would have accepted the Rolling Stones suggestion about Rock and Rock except for David Bowie’s The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, in which Bowie describes his involvement as a HWT agent — named Ziggy Stardust.

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The Hidden History of Hwt, or Hwt’s in a Name?

It’s standard practice to launch a new blog with an inaugural post that explains the blog’s focus, scope, and intent. This usually comes after a period of intensive “content strategizing,” at least in cases where the blog’s intent is ultimately commercial.

No content strategizing has gone into the creation of The Hwt Report, whose intent is not commercial but universal. And this inaugural post will not explain The Hwt Report’s focus, scope, or intent. Or if it does, it will only be indirectly and unintentionally.

Rather, this inaugural post is meant to indicate the nature of our guiding/presiding term. Not to define it, mind you, but to flesh out its connotations. Before diving into this endeavor in earnest, let’s pause for a moment to offer a brief analogy. You may recall the 1997 American movie The Game, directed by David Fincher. Wikipedia summarizes the movie and its plot like this: “The Game is a 1997 neo-noir psychological thriller film directed by David Fincher, starring Michael Douglas, featuring Sean Penn, and produced by Polygram. It tells the story of an investment banker who is given a mysterious gift: participation in a game that integrates in strange ways with his life. As the lines between the banker’s real life and the game become more uncertain, hints of a large conspiracy become apparent.”

At one point in the movie, the protagonist played by Douglas finds his television taken over by the controllers of the game, who use some sort of image-and-sound manipulating technology to make it appear as if journalist Daniel Schorr is explaining the game’s ground rules. Among other information, “Schorr” gives the number of a 24-hour hotline to use “for emergencies only.” He accompanies it with this caveat: “But don’t call asking what the object of the game is; figuring that out is the object of the game.”

Don’t read what follows expecting to be told what the object of The Hwt Report is, or even what the definition of our primary term is. Figuring that out is the object of The Hwt Report (as much for us as for you).

Hwt by analogy, or rather two of them

FIRST ANALOGY:

Robert Anton Wilson and Robert Shea — R.I.P, both – introduced the word — and concept — “fnord” in the Illuminatus! Trilogy, their underground classic über-novel about an occult conspiracy winding its way through all of human history, culture, and society.  “Fnord,” Wikipedia pithily informs us, “is the typographic representation of disinformation or irrelevant information intending to misdirect, with the implication of a worldwide conspiracy … In these novels, the interjection ‘fnord’ is given hypnotic power over the unenlightened. Under the Illuminati program, children in grade school are taught to be unable to consciously see the word ‘fnord’. For the rest of their lives, every appearance of the word subconsciously generates a feeling of uneasiness and confusion, and prevents rational consideration of the subject. This results in a perpetual low-grade state of fear in the populace. The government acts on the premise that a fearful populace keeps them in power. In the Shea/Wilson construct, fnords are scattered liberally in the text of newspapers and magazines, causing fear and anxiety in those following current events. However, there are no fnords in the advertisements, encouraging a consumerist society. It is implied in the books that fnord is not the actual word used for this task, but merely a substitute, since most readers would be unable to see the actual word.”

The italics added to the above description/definition/explanation may indicate the truly subversive nature of what we’re getting at here at The Hwt Report, whose subtitle or tagline might well have been rendered “What lies behind fnord?” In other words, take care not to burn yourself as you read. You’re playing with hwt.

SECOND ANALOGY

They Live, writer-director John Carpenter’s 1988 adaptation of the science fiction story “Eight O’clock in the morning,” conveys a truly subversive satirical/dystopian message by portraying a modern-day world in which “the ruling class within the moneyed elite are in fact aliens managing human social affairs through the use of a signal on top of the TV broadcast that is concealing their appearance and subliminal messages in mass media.”  Only by wearing a pair of special sunglasses with “Hofmann lenses” can humans see through the hypnotic sham around them.

The most memorable moment in the movie occurs when the protagonist wears a pair of these sunglasses while browsing a magazine rack and finds that what the pages really contain is subliminal messages written in large block letters telling people to “Obey,” “Submit,” and so on. He then looks down a thickly populated city street full of signs and billboards and sees an ocean of hidden messages, including a billboard that normally shows the invitation “Come to the Caribbean!” (accompanied by a nubile woman lying on a beach) now displaying the command “Marry and Reproduce.” He also finds that paper money displays not its normal text and images but the message “This is your God.”

The Hwt Report is a cyberfied pair of Hofmann lenses.

The pronunciation of hwt

In his best-selling modern classic The Tao of Pooh, which uses the characters and worldview of the Winnie the Pooh books to explain the principles of Taoism to modern Westerners, Benjamin Hoff devotes a paragraph to explaining how to pronounce Tao Te Ching, the title of Taoism’s most famous book, and also the name of the book’s author, usually rendered Lao Tzu (but also offered in various alternative forms by various translators, including Lao Tse, Lao Zi, and Laozu). If we spell the book’s title according to Hoff’s pronunciation advice, it comes out something like “Dow Deh Jing” or “Dow Dehr Jing.”

Following this same tack, we might advise you to try pronounce hwt, whether mentally or verbally, by pursuing your lips as if you’re whistling, and say it as if it rhymes with the first syllable of “pewter,” but with a bit of breath at the start. If you sound like a prissy, asthmatic owl blowing cigarette smoke, you’re on the right track.

But we hasten to add that no human pronunciation can ever fully capture the nuances of hwt, which may hail from or be related to the cosmic language spoken by the gods of ancient Egypt, and also the language spoken by Lovecraft’s Old Ones, including dread Cthulhu, who now lies dreaming in the sunken city of R’lyeh. The human vocal apparatus cannot speak his name. Most people say “Ca-thool-hoo,” but Lovecraft scholar S. T. Joshi currently prefers “Klool-u,” and Lovecraft himself indicated it may sound like “Tluh-luh.”

Hwt is beyond words.

A brief history of hwt

With the opening consideration dispensed with, here’s a partial and random history of where hwt has – or may have – appeared throughout human history and culture. Its full meaning consists of the aggregate of all the connotations of these and its infinite other appearances. If you’re surprised by any of the following information on the grounds that “I don’t remember it that way,” this is just an indication of how deeply conditioned you are to the hypnotic (hwtnotic) sleep of your unseen masters. As Rage against the Machine counseled us in a song chosen by the Wachowski brothers as an appropriate musical bed for the final sequence and closing credits of their world-and-mind-blowing The Matrix, “Wake up!”

HWT IN PHILOSOPHY

Descartes’ most famous philosophical statement is actually “I think, therefore I hwt.” He may also have said “I hwt, therefore I am.” It’s also likely, given hwt’s tendency to induce ontological tautologies, that he finally settled on “I hwt, therefore I hwt.”

Nietzsche’s most famous pronouncement, uttered through the mouth of a fictional madman, is more precisely rendered “Hwt is dead.” And also “God is hwt.” And also, in the same tautological manner mentioned above, “Hwt is hwt.”

The original title of the final section Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged, the part where Dagny Taggart wakes up from her plane crash to find herself in the hidden utopia (“Atlantis”) created by the world’s productive industrialists, was “A is Hwt.”

HWT IN COMEDY

Abbott and Costello’s most famous comedy routine was originally titled “Hwt’s on First.”

HWT IN MUSIC

Many bands and artists have changed their names to hide the hwt, including Blue Öyster Hwt, Hwtie and the Blowfish, Jimi Hwtrix

A raft of the Beatles’ most famous songs had their titles changed at the last minute, including “I Want to Hwt Your Hand,” “Hwt Day’s Night,” “Hwt!”, “Hwter Skelter,” “Hwt Jude,” and “Twist and Hwt.”

RELIGION AND SPIRITUALITY

The Book of Genesis actually opens with, “In the beginning, God created the heavens and the hwt.”

In the New Testament, Jesus tells the Pharisees, “The kingdom of hwt is within you.” He also announces that the most important commandment is “You shall love the Lord your God with all your hwt, soul, and mind,” and that it’s matched by the commandment to “Love your neighbor as your hwt.” Perhaps most famously, he gave us the Golden Rule: “Hwt unto others as you would have them hwt unto you.”

The first noble truth of Buddhism is “All life is hwt.”

Modern-day spiritual teacher Eckhart Tolle originally titled his first book “The Power of Hwt.”

MOVIES

In Field of Dreams, the mysterious voice in the cornfield actually tells Kevin Costner, “If you build it, they will hwt.” And “If you hwt it, they will come.” And also, of course, “If you hwt it, they will hwt.”

Jack Nicholson actually starred in One Hwt over the Cuckoo’s Hwt.”

Stanley Kubrick’s oeuvre is chock-full of hwt. Dr. Strangelove: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Hwt. 2001: A Hwt Odyssey. A Hwtwork Orange. Hwt Metal Jacket. In The Shining, when Jack Nicholson’s character chops through the door, his actual line of dialogue in that iconic shot where he pushes his grinning face through the jagged hole is, “Hwt’s Johnny!” He also says, “Wendy, I’m hwt.”

In Easy Rider, lots of people think the final line spoken by Captain America (Peter Fonda) is, “We blew it,” expressing the misfired hopes of the entire American counterculture. But of course he really says, “We hwt it.”

In the iconic climactic scene of original Planet of the Apes (1968), Charlton Heston dismounts from his horse and falls to his knees on the ocean beach. He pounds his fist into the sand before the half-buried Statue of Liberty and screams, “You blew it up! God damn you all! God damn you all to hwt!” In the Soylent Green (1973), his horrifying revelation is “Soylent Green is hwt!”

TELEVISION

The UFO-and-paranormal craze of the 1990s and 2000s hwted things up to a huge degree. Of particular note is Chris Carter’s masterwork, The Hwt-Files.

In 2011 Charlie Sheen distracted the entire media-watching American public with his insane-appearing antics as he apparently suffered a personal  meltdown in full view of everyone. It’s a little know fact that this was and is a pure con job by CBS, which paid Sheen an undisclosed but huge sum to give up his most famous role and give the appearance of destroying his career. The object? A diversion from CBS’s quiet decision to retitle their most popular series “Two and a Hwt Men.”

“Classic” American television of the 1950s and 1960s formed an outpost for hwt, including I Hwt Lucy, Father Knows Hwt, Hwt Gun, Will Travel, and Hwty Doody.

To be continued