Monthly Archives: October 2013

HWT – Campus News

Anycampus, USA

Anycampus, USA

Any College, USA   October 15, 2013       An enterprising first-semester student has discovered a ground-breaking technique in English that threatens to erase decades, if not centuries, of traditional scholastic effort. According to another student, this concept will “spread to every student, on every campus, for every college in the world,” and “[it]… will never stop.”

Many college professors have given up on directly confronting this technique by simply ignoring it. Jack E. T. “Patch” Brown, PhD. believes, “there isn’t much use fighting it directly. I mean, what good would that do?” He later explains, “sure, some students have explored various parts of technique in the past, but it has gone too far now to turn back. Even worse, it is now popping up all over campus. It can’t be stopped!”

Brown goes on to identify the technique as pieced together from evidence:

  • Part One – A student is given an assignment, usually involving a research, a writing component, and a sufficient amount of time to complete the assignment.
  • Part Two – Students discern the complex activities involved in a detailed effort to complete the project in order to come up “the plan” to complete the project.
  • Part Three – The deception begins. Using various forms of deception and deep-cover, psychological manipulation, students embark on a series of apparent missteps  to throw off professors from perception into “the plan.” Often, the deception is so complete, professors have no indication that students have begun the project or even acknowledged its receipt.
  • Part Four – Now at the most critical stage, “the plan” is implemented in a full-on torrent of activity that incites incredible feats of planning, activity, and endurance as the student begins assimilating information, applying concepts, and satisfying requirements appropriate for the assignment. Typically, “the plan” is delayed until the last possible moment to prevent unwanted interference from professors, tutors, librarians, or other academics. Simply, this academic tour-de-force is an individual effort and represents the actions of the student as both hero and scholastic “lone wolf.”
  • Part Five – Sabotage: Arguably the most confusing aspect of this technique is the intentional deconstruction of various components within the project to prevent “too high of a score.” Many senior faculty believe this to be the equivalent of missing questions intentionally on a test when you cheat to prevent suspicion. Similarly, those using “the plan” often obfuscate “the plan’s” success to prevent professors from detecting it as part of the process.

graduate-150374_150While the identity of the student remains a mystery, some believe that he did not act alone. According to statements from Anycampus president Lee Metyd Tolrence:

“We have reason to believe that students on other campus have been discovered using this technique to complete their work. Since we do not know who the original student was, we can only assume that more than one student is now perpetuating this and sharing it with others. As for the extent of this problem, we have no idea how to contain it, prevent it, or contend with its inevitable spread. We recommend faculty accept this as the new practice for all students, and we hope they make whatever adjustments necessary to safeguard academic rigor in coursework and quality in the classroom.”      –Anycampus president Lee Metyd Tolrence

Students seem to be unusually content to keep this secret. Despite numerous attempts to find the identity of the technique’s creator, no one seemed willing to talk. In fact, many abruptly left upon mention of the student, the technique, “the plan,” or anything about how students plan on completing assignments.

Without question, HWT has influenced the college campus. Today it has changed how students complete assignments. What will it change tomorrow?